Enoch Cree Nation Archives 8History Overview

 

Enoch Cree Nation’s earliest known Chief, Chief Lapotac (“The Hunter” B. 1820 – D. 1861), was presumed likely from the Strongwood Cree, the original peoples of the Beaver Hills area since 1670 . ECN, then known as the Lapotac Band was also linked to the Asino Wachi Cree and Amisk-wachee peoples, all of whom gathered in the Beaver Hills around Fort Edmonton.

The Lapotac Band was formally recognized in 1842 and had a primary economy of fur trading and hunting for the Hudson’s Bay Company by operating buffalo pounds.

In 1877, Chief Thomas Lapotac (Tommy), Chief Lapotac’s son would sign the Treaty No. Six Adhesions at Fort Edmonton (August 9th, 1877) and Blackfoot Crossing (September 25th, 1877) on behalf of “Tommy’s Band”, formally recognizing it. Unfortunately, in 1883 Chief Tommy Lapotac passed away; his brother Enoch Lapotac would then become the Chief of the Nation.

 

In September 1884, Chief Lapotac accepted the formal survey of our Nation’s traditional land mass; however, in 1902 and 1908 our Nation’s land mass was reduced by over 15, 200 acres, reducing our Nation’s land to nearly half of its original size.

In 1894, 79 members of the Pahs-Pahs-Chase Band formally joined ECN. Today our Nation is made up of nearly 2,100 members.

FOR MORE INFO ABOUT OUR HISTORY BE SURE TO CHECK OUT OUR ARCHIVES DEPT. WEBSITE COMING SOON!!!

Visit of Queen Elizabeth - 1939